Literary magazine – NKY Zine http://nkyzine.com/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 00:42:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nkyzine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/favicon-1-120x120.png Literary magazine – NKY Zine http://nkyzine.com/ 32 32 Sight Magazine – Pelosi arrives in Taiwan pledging US commitment; China enraged https://nkyzine.com/sight-magazine-pelosi-arrives-in-taiwan-pledging-us-commitment-china-enraged/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 22:30:36 +0000 https://nkyzine.com/sight-magazine-pelosi-arrives-in-taiwan-pledging-us-commitment-china-enraged/ August 03, 2022 PATRICIA ZENGERLE and MICHAEL MARTINA Taipei, TaiwanReuters US House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi arrived in Taiwan on Tuesday evening on a trip she says shows unwavering US commitment to the self-governing island claimed by China, but China has condemned the US visit at the highest level in 25 years as a […]]]>

Taipei, Taiwan
Reuters

US House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi arrived in Taiwan on Tuesday evening on a trip she says shows unwavering US commitment to the self-governing island claimed by China, but China has condemned the US visit at the highest level in 25 years as a threat to peace. and stability in the Taiwan Strait.

Pelosi and the rest of her delegation disembarked from a US Air Force transport plane at Songshan Airport in downtown Taipei after landing overnight on a flight from Malaysia to begin a visit that risks pushing US-China relations to a new low. They were greeted by Taiwan’s Foreign Minister Joseph Wu and Sandra Oudkirk, the United States’ top representative in Taiwan.

Taiwanese Foreign Minister Joseph Wu greets Speaker of the United States House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi at Taipei Songshan Airport in Taipei, Taiwan, August 2. PHOTO: Taiwan Ministry of Foreign Affairs/Handout via Reuters

His arrival provoked a furious reaction from China at a time when international tensions are already heightened by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. China considers Taiwan to be part of its territory and has never renounced the use of force to bring it under its control. The United States has warned China against using the visit as a pretext for military action against Taiwan.

“Our congressional delegation’s visit to Taiwan honors America’s unwavering commitment to supporting Taiwan’s vibrant democracy,” Pelosi said in a statement shortly after landing. “America’s solidarity with Taiwan’s 23 million people is more important now than ever, as the world faces a choice between autocracy and democracy.”

Pelosi, second in line to the US presidency, is a longtime critic of China.

Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen will meet Pelosi on Wednesday morning and then have lunch together, the presidential office said. Pelosi, traveling with six other U.S. lawmakers, became the highest-ranking U.S. political leader to visit Taiwan since 1997.

China’s Foreign Ministry said it had lodged a strong protest with the United States, saying Pelosi’s visit seriously undermines peace and stability in the Taiwan Strait, “has a serious impact on the political foundations of China-US relations and seriously undermines China’s sovereignty and territorial sovereignty.” integrity”.



Chinese warplanes buzzed the line dividing the Taiwan Strait ahead of its arrival. China’s military has been placed on high alert and will launch “targeted military operations” in response to Pelosi’s visit, the Defense Ministry said.

The Chinese military has announced joint air and sea exercises near Taiwan from Tuesday evening and test launches of conventional missiles in the sea east of Taiwan, the Chinese state news agency Xinhua describing live-fire and other drills around Taiwan from Thursday to Sunday.

Pelosi is on an Asia tour which includes announced visits to Singapore, Malaysia, South Korea and Japan. His visit to Taiwan was unannounced but largely anticipated.

In a Washington Post opinion piece published after the landing, Pelosi explained his visit, praising Taiwan’s commitment to democratic government while criticizing China as having significantly increased tensions with Taiwan in recent years.

“We cannot sit idly by as the CCP continues to threaten Taiwan — and democracy itself,” Pelosi said, referring to the Chinese Communist Party.

Pelosi also cited China’s “brutal crackdown” on political dissent in Hong Kong and its treatment of Muslim Uyghurs and other minorities, which the United States has called genocide.

Taiwan Taipei Nancy Pelosi and Joseph Wu2

Taiwanese Foreign Minister Joseph Wu greets Speaker of the United States House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi at Taipei Songshan Airport in Taipei, Taiwan, August 2. PHOTO: Taiwan Ministry of Foreign Affairs/Handout via Reuters.

As Pelosi’s motorcade approached his hotel, escorted by police cars with flashing red and blue lights, dozens of supporters cheered and ran toward the black vehicles, arms outstretched and phone cameras turned on. The motorcade drove straight into the hotel parking lot.

On Tuesday evening, Taiwan’s tallest building, Taipei 101, lit up with messages such as: “Welcome to Taiwan”, “Speaker Pelosi” and “Taiwan (Heart) USA”.

The White House reacts
White House national security spokesman John Kirby said after Pelosi’s arrival that the United States “will not be intimidated” by China’s threats or belligerent rhetoric and that it will not There is no reason for his visit to precipitate a crisis or a conflict.

“We will continue to support Taiwan, stand up for a free and open Indo-Pacific, and seek to maintain communication with Beijing,” Kirby said during a later White House briefing, adding that the United States “does not will not deliver to saber blows”.

Kirby said China could engage in “economic coercion” on Taiwan, adding that the impact on US-China relations will depend on Beijing’s actions in the days and weeks ahead.

Pelosi, 82, is a close ally of US President Joe Biden, both members of the Democratic Party, and has helped guide his legislative agenda in Congress.

Four sources said Pelosi is also expected to meet on Wednesday with activists who are outspoken about China’s human rights record.


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The United States has no formal diplomatic relations with Taiwan but is required by US law to provide it with the means to defend itself. China sees visits by US officials to Taiwan as an encouraging signal for the island’s pro-independence camp. Taiwan rejects China’s sovereignty claims, saying only the Taiwanese people can decide the island’s future.

Several Chinese fighter jets flew near the midline dividing the Taiwan Strait on Tuesday morning before heading back out later in the day, a source told Reuters. Several Chinese warships have also sailed near the unofficial demarcation line since Monday and remained there, the source said.

Taiwan’s Defense Ministry said 21 Chinese planes entered its air defense identification zone on Tuesday and China was trying to threaten key ports and cities with drills around the island. Taiwan’s armed forces have “enhanced” their level of vigilance, he added.

Taylor Fravel, a Chinese military expert at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said China’s planned drills appear to be more far-reaching than during the Taiwan Strait crisis in 1995 and 1996.

“Taiwan will face military exercises and missile tests from the north, south, east and west. This is unprecedented,” Fravel said.

Four American warships, including the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reaganwere positioned in waters east of Taiwan in what the US Navy called routine deployments.

Russia, locked in a confrontation with the West over its invasion of Ukraine, condemned Pelosi’s visit. Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova called the United States a “state provocateur”.

– Additional reporting by IDREES ALI and TREVOR HUNNICUTT

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The Living Daylights: adaptation of a short story https://nkyzine.com/the-living-daylights-adaptation-of-a-short-story/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://nkyzine.com/the-living-daylights-adaptation-of-a-short-story/ Living daylights at 35 The decision to translate a short story into a feature film presents a unique set of challenges. In 1985, after a remarkable streak of 12 years and 7 films, Sir Roger Moore hung up his Walther PPK and called him one day as James Bond 007. As is often the case […]]]>

Living daylights at 35

The decision to translate a short story into a feature film presents a unique set of challenges. In 1985, after a remarkable streak of 12 years and 7 films, Sir Roger Moore hung up his Walther PPK and called him one day as James Bond 007. As is often the case when a new actor arrives, the producers tend to dial things back up a few levels. Current co-producers Barbara Broccoli and Michael G. Wilson reiterated the importance of finding inspiration in Fleming’s work (see 2006 Casino Royale).

By the late 1980s, there was little valuable Fleming material left to adapt for the big screen. An intriguing mission caught the studio’s attention; a short story called Living daylights (from now on TLDs). Published posthumously with other stories under the title Octopussy and the Living Daylights, it was pure Fleming. Additionally, producer Albert “Cubby” Broccoli’s choice for the 4e 007 was the classically trained Welshman, Timothy Dalton. A self-proclaimed student of Fleming and early Connery films, Dalton was the perfect choice to take the series back to its grittier roots.

The little story

by Ian Fleming TLDs barely 30 pages. What it lacks in scope, it makes up for by going succinctly to the heart of what the literary 007 was all about.

M enlists Bond for an unpleasant mission. 007 must travel to West Berlin to protect an insider. Their sleeper agent plans to rush across the East-West border on one of the next three evenings. The problem is that the opposition’s own spies caught wind of the double agent’s hopeful escape. As such, an East German or Russian sniper will surely overlook the designated area. Bond’s mission: kill the sniper.

The British spy heads towards a dreary apartment building in a dreary part of West Berlin in gloomy weather. His handler Sender is a stuffy pencil pusher. Days are spent in cafes and wandering museums and parks. In the evening, it focuses exclusively on the four dark windows of a humorless Soviet ministry across the border. Or so he should. On the first day, Bond notices a group of female instrumentalists entering the building and a pretty blonde with a cello case. In love, the protagonist cannot help but think of her and how curious it is that she wields such a gigantic instrument.

On the third and final night, when the British double agent crosses the restless zone, the eastern sniper appears better. The beautiful cellist! Rather than liquidate her, the Englishman mutilates her. The man inside makes it through, but Sender despises the hero for not buying into the mission. Bond replies:

“She scared him in broad daylight. In my book, that was enough. Let’s go.”

The heart of the story

That’s about it for the record. It presents a wonderful, focused take on Bond and his world and can be read in about an hour. But a 2 hour feature film, that’s definitely not the case.

As had to be done with the three previous films (Just for your eyes, Octopus, A view to kill), a brief and timely adventure inspired the script of a feature film. Easier said than done. Working in favor of the film was the return of co-writers Richard Maibaum and Michael G. Wilson. The latter would go on to become one of the leading producers in the 1990s and the former was a seasoned scribe. His film adaptations date back to Dr. No in 1962, although he did not work on all of them. Additionally, director John Glen has embarked on his 4e 007, after going through Moore’s last 3 releases and adjusting the tone from film to film.

Movie adaptation
Image: EON/DANJAQ

At the heart of Fleming’s work are two things. First, the protagonist falls in love with a woman who turns out to be his target to kill. Second, the infamous East-West tensions of the Cold War, in this case through the prism of the defection of a double agent. The key here was to take those ideas and weave them into a package that global audiences would recognize as an animated Bond extravaganza. Obviously, the drive from East to West Berlin couldn’t serve as the film’s climax. It can work for a Adapted by John Le Carrébut not a Bond picture.

cute girl with cello

It could, however, serve as a plot point through which the protagonist meets his leading lady. This chance encounter would be wrapped around the plot of a Soviet double agent’s defection, much like in the source material. The latter would be rooted in the modern geopolitics of the time, a period during which the Soviet Union lived its own version of the Vietnam War in Afghanistan.

Without getting bogged down in all the details, John Glen’s film sends its protagonist (Dalton) to Bratislava (now the capital of Slovakia) to oversee the defection of rogue Soviet general Georgi Koskov (Jeroen Krabbé) on the evening of a big concert. The gentleman spy meets his contact at the opera where he notices a lovely cello girl (Maryam d’Abo). Sure enough, on the night Bond watches from his safe house and General Koskov crosses the street, the sniper tasked with taking down the traitorous Soviet is the beautiful cellist. Bond aims her gun, sensing that she cannot distinguish one end of the rifle from another. She couldn’t be a real shooter. Something is wrong.

Living daylights
image: EON/DANJAQ

007’s instincts serve him well. The wife, Kara, is actually Koskov’s lover. Why the theatre? Koskov wants MI6 to believe that notorious Russian general Pushkin (John Rhys-Davies) has gone mad with power and needs to be liquidated. Bond is too good a detective and smells a trap. He returns to Bratislava, meets Kara, claims to be Koskov’s friend and promises to take her to her boyfriend. In truth, the secret agent uses Kara to find out exactly why Koskov double-crossed the British. What ensues is a labyrinthine get-rich-quick scheme involving a disgraced US Army man turned arms dealer (Joe Don Baker), the mujahideen, the war in Afghanistan, opium and an old villain from the stories. from Fleming: SMERSH.

True to Fleming

There is no doubt that TLDs features a head-scratching plot. It’s hugely complex, and while it ultimately makes just enough sense, most won’t understand it on first viewing. No harm, no fault.

Beyond the overly convoluted plot, it’s a story that directly recalls the best of Ian Fleming. Le Lien des livres can only come to the aid of a woman in peril. He’s also an excellent detective and spots clues that end up adding to the villains’ ridiculous storylines. Finally, the Cold War was a regular background threat, especially in the first 5 books, although tension with the Soviets rears its ugly head in some of the latest stories (property of a lady).

Living daylights
Image: MGM/DANJAQ

The chemistry between Dalton and d’Abo serves as a terrific romantic anchor. Those who know the news are rewarded with its expansion. In the final lines, Bond thinks he will never see her again and that she will most likely be punished by her superiors for not killing the traitor. In the film, he sees her again and slowly but surely a romance develops. The simplicity of a Soviet defection is revisited, revealing a much grander but overall realistic scheme. Finally, tying Koskov’s lens to the grueling war in Afghanistan of the 1980s is another example of Bond films drawing inspiration from current events. It wasn’t the first time, it wouldn’t be the last.

Not all of Fleming’s short stories have been tactfully made into movies. From a sight to a murder has more than one plot but has yet to be exploited (the movie has nothing to do with the Fleming text). TLDs is an excellent example of marrying the characteristic Flemish touches with the brilliance of the film series.

-Edgar Chaput

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Ancient herpes viruses may have spread through kissing https://nkyzine.com/ancient-herpes-viruses-may-have-spread-through-kissing/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 18:33:22 +0000 https://nkyzine.com/ancient-herpes-viruses-may-have-spread-through-kissing/ Believe it or not, 3.7 billion people have herpes. Most get it through harmless interactions, like sharing a spoon or kissing a baby, and are completely unaware of it. After all, it’s usually dormant, and for most people, it only causes periodic cold sores. Despite its prevalence, scientists still argue over when herpes first infected […]]]>

Believe it or not, 3.7 billion people have herpes. Most get it through harmless interactions, like sharing a spoon or kissing a baby, and are completely unaware of it. After all, it’s usually dormant, and for most people, it only causes periodic cold sores.

Despite its prevalence, scientists still argue over when herpes first infected humans. Some claim it followed us when we left Africa, but others suggest a more recent origin when cities began to flourish. In a new study, scientists have sequenced the first four herpes genomes from cadavers. They concluded that modern strains of the virus date back to the Bronze Age, around the time when – you guessed it – people started kissing.

“Something happened about five thousand years ago that allowed one strain of herpes to overtake all others,” says co-author Christiana Scheib from the University of Cambridge in a Press release.

The team examined 3,000 archaeological digs and found evidence of herpes in four. The samples, which they collected in Russia, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, range from the 3rd to the 17th century. It’s older than the previous one oldest herpes genome from a New York patient in 1925. They then compiled the entire genomes of three of them.

By comparing the three ancient genomes to the known genetic diversity of herpes today, scientists calibrated an evolutionary clock describing how quickly herpes DNA mutated between ancient and modern variants. They then used this mutation rate to recalculate the birth time of the original herpes infection. They discovered it was 5,000 years ago in the Bronze Age.

The time had come for viral spread for two reasons: people moved into dense cities and they started kissing. Bronze Age humans migrated from Eurasia to Europe, and they flocked to cities, where neighbors might have spread herpes. Additionally, the earliest known literary evidence of kissing dates back to an Indian manuscript from the same period. If labia locking had become commonplace, it could have promoted transmission between romantic partners.

Herpes is a lifelong infection that is normally dormant, but it can flare up and cause painful cold sores. This is normally not a big problem. But the virus can interact with other diseases like HIV and medical interventions such as caesareans have more extreme, sometimes fatal effects.

At this time, herpes is not curable. To develop more effective treatment options, researchers need to better understand how herpes has adapted to our bodies and how our immune systems fight back. But the disease is transmitted and evolves slowly, so they need ancient samples to understand the viral-immune arms race. The ones reported here might be a good start, but Scheib says in a press release that she hopes to dig down to the root of human evolution: “Neanderthal herpes is my next mountain to climb.”

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Live music throughout dog days https://nkyzine.com/live-music-throughout-dog-days/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 21:03:15 +0000 https://nkyzine.com/live-music-throughout-dog-days/ Three local venues support live music during scorching summer days Where Live local music during the hot summer days By Davis Coen Things tend to slow down in Oxford during the summer months, but you could say this is a favorable transition and a unique time for the local music scene. In some cases, it’s […]]]>

Three local venues support live music during scorching summer days

Where Live local music during the hot summer days

By Davis Coen

Things tend to slow down in Oxford during the summer months, but you could say this is a favorable transition and a unique time for the local music scene.

In some cases, it’s because of the appeal of outdoor venues…and in others, the intimacy of removing much of the University’s population from the equation.

Three venues in Oxford city center – all with stages, designed lighting and an audio backline – will be slightly reminiscent of this but will continue a steady stream of live music offerings during the scorching days of the week. ‘summer. Either way, these venues will provide unwavering support to the local music community and its fans.

Proud Larry’s has been a mainstay in the square for decades and has become a local landmark. Although a modest 300-seat venue, it has become widely known for booking countless national acts for sold-out shows. These included Modest Mouse, Elvis Costello, Jason Isbell, Warren Zevon, Sturgill Simpson, and The black keys. Plus, avant-garde blues numbers from the past and present, and the best from all corners of the alternative scene.

Although football will always remain Oxford’s main attraction, Proud Larry’s, since its opening in 1993, has helped to ensure that musical entertainment is not far behind, along with culinary, literary and historical attractions.

The Green at Harrison’s and Rafter’s on the Square are newcomers, but much like Larry’s continue to remain highly relevant after the student exodus in the spring, and according to owners and management, they intend to continue throughout the duration of heat waves.

Midsummer is a good time for a musical series

Local rock bands Wannu? and The division of pearls are among those that Larry’s owner, Scott Caradine, has planned to appear at his venue regularly during the summer months, the latter starting with a residency in June, with a handful of dates on Wednesday nights starting around 9 p.m. . little thing that happens,” he said of The Pearl Divide, a four-piece band from Jackson made up of Ole Miss students.

“We try to do weekday shows and new artists that people don’t know yet, in a free situation,” Louisiana native Lafayette, Caradine, said of his popular establishment at 211 South Lamar Blvd.

He expressed great enthusiasm for one of the venue’s first shows after Memorial Day, the Nashville singer-songwriter George Shingleton. “He is killer,” Caradine said. He’s a country artist with a real team behind him, has some good stuff going on and seems to be growing,” he said. “Nobody knows who he is here yet, but he could be one of those guys who in a year or two you could say ‘I saw this guy for free on a Thursday night at Larry’s’.”

The renowned venue, and beloved family restaurant and bar, has also gained a reputation for booking these weekly residences for the early evening hours on weekdays, closer to what can be considered happy hour, sometimes a mixture of a host of seasoned bars and dining for all ages. enthusiasts.

Some notable early evening acts included Jimbo Mathus, George McConnell, The Kenny Brown Band, Tate Moore, The Bill Perry Trio, and Davis Coen.

“It gives people something to get out of the house, when it’s easy to sit inside with the air conditioning. It’s a hard time for me to get off the couch,” he joked. “I think it’s a good opportunity for people to get out there and see quality music live”

Caradine reflected on the slow rise of the past two summers and said that just a year ago it seemed like people were finally showing some enthusiasm to get out there and watch music again, “because they hungry for it,” he said. And as he entered June, he noticed that people were becoming even more comfortable going back to see shows.

“We have a good mix of local artists and up-and-coming bands… all of whom have an ongoing buzz somewhere. It’s just a matter of trying to help them grow, and at the same time bring new music to town,” Caradine said.

The summer lineup so far has been highlighted by the synth-pop duo And the echoand country westernswho are signed to Fat Possum Records.

An outdoor delight directly off the square

A treat for local live music fans since March 2021 is The Green at Harrison’s, the new interactive backyard at Harrison’s 1810 Bar and Grill, a stone’s throw from neighboring Proud Larry’s.

Known primarily as a college bar, Harrison’s has broadened its appeal with its spacious and relaxing outdoor setting, equipped with comfortable booths, a host of flat-screen TVs, cornhole boards and watertight pool tables, often with canvas background a breathtaking early evening sky.

The venue also boasts a sizable and prominent stage setup, fully equipped to accommodate national tours, pending repetitive and ongoing struggles with a few testy neighbors and an ordinance that limits outside sound for commercial ventures.

Notable performers gracing the stage include the Grammy-nominated rapper, singer, and multi-instrumentalist Afro man, and rock bands The Stolen Faces, Southern Groove Redemption, The Orange Constant, 2 Beans, Riverside Voodoo, and The Vegabonds.

Managing Director Hayes Dent has worked at Harrison since the doors opened in September 2018, after Griffin Tanner bought what was once Frank & Marlee’s, and during that time his roles have varied from doorman to iron spearheads the coordination of some of the best summer music the city has offered in years.

Distinctly, The Green was one of many local venues to host the ninth annual Oxford Blues Festival at the end of September. The June music calendar featured some quality acts with outstanding draws, such as Traveler, The Band, Garshand Highland Sunday.

The venue still hosts some of the most exciting local and regional acts, in what is known as the Summer Concert Series, with a stripped-down, usually acoustic act, starting around 4 or 5 p.m., followed by bands or band combos around 8 p.m.

“The Green’s setup is almost as good as you can get for a live venue,” Dent said. “We just had a non-stop battle with our sound prescription, it toned down the music.”

The Green at Harrison’s currently has a petition with over 1,500 signatures and continues to gain a positive reputation as a premier live music destination. “We don’t believe that people who don’t want this to happen outweigh people who do,” Dent said.

Sunday pickin’ and grinnin’ served with a side of the gospel

Rafter’s on the Square, which lives upstairs in what used to be the historic and historic Henry Hotel, has also been a key player, and at the forefront of live music venues since the company was opened by the Chadwick family, and will continue to be so through the milder of south central months.

Local Favorite Members Rocket 88and Joe Austin and the Tallahatchies will swap on Sundays and choose precisely the acoustic sounds that your ears and your doctor have prescribed, to relax you during a burden-free afternoon, during the scorching days of summer.

The musical association of the couple Jamie and Rosamond Posey, as well as seasoned accompanists Eric Carlton (keyboards) and Nathan Robbins (bass, guitar, vocals), is enough to make a Bloody Mary or a Mimosa pass like medicine to your mouth during a carefree brunch. .

Along with tried-and-true originals, the band features energetic favorites from John Prine, Dylan and The Stones, plus uplifting spiritual staples like “Let the Church Roll On,” “Up Above My Head,” and “Will the Circle Be Unbroken.” ”

Like Rocket 88 bassist Nate Robbins, Joe Austin hails from nearby Pontotoc and, like the Poseys, his musical roots are steeped in gospel music.

“We hope it inspires all age groups and appeals to all kinds of people,” said venue manager Caroline Parker, who fondly calls the summertime musical vibe “soulful,” perhaps compared to d other times of the year.

Parker also works at the Yoknapatawpha Arts Council, based at the Powerhouse on University Avenue and enjoys seeing the community bond as she shares her hours in the service industry.

She started at Rafter’s in May 2020, “right in the middle of the pandemic,” Parker said. The spacious venue was able to proceed cautiously with their Sunday brunches, and she credits live music as what has held people together through tough times.

“He now continues to bring people together and hold people together, but in different ways,” she said, “and to uplift everyone as a community. For Oxford, I think that’s huge to have live music in the square on Sundays.We are one of the only places to do this on a regular basis.

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New Conceptions editor predicts bold moves for the prestigious magazine https://nkyzine.com/new-conceptions-editor-predicts-bold-moves-for-the-prestigious-magazine/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 07:02:34 +0000 https://nkyzine.com/new-conceptions-editor-predicts-bold-moves-for-the-prestigious-magazine/ On April 23, the University of New Mexico Student Publications Board selected Sierra Martinez as the new editor of the literary arts magazine Conceptions Southwest. Martinez brings editorial experience, refined taste and a bold vision for the future to this historic magazine. Beginning in 1978, Southwest Conceptions is UNM’s premier annual fine arts and literature […]]]>

On April 23, the University of New Mexico Student Publications Board selected Sierra Martinez as the new editor of the literary arts magazine Conceptions Southwest. Martinez brings editorial experience, refined taste and a bold vision for the future to this historic magazine.

Beginning in 1978, Southwest Conceptions is UNM’s premier annual fine arts and literature magazine that accepts submissions from all members of the UNM community, including undergraduate and graduate students, faculty , staff and alumni. Conceptions takes submissions in poetry, short fiction, creative non-fiction, visual arts, photography, and open media, an open category that ranges from short films to sculptures — anything otherwise difficult to publish.

Martinez, a fifth-year student majoring in English and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies began her time with Conceptions her sophomore year of college, just before the university closed due to the coronavirus pandemic. COVID-19. Since then, she has served as a staff member and editor of Scribendi, a national fine arts and literature magazine centered on the UNM Honors College, and as a staff member of the 2022 issue of Conceptions under the editorship of editor Zoe Perls.

Her previous experience with Scribendi was key in preparing her to edit the 46th edition of Conceptions, according to Martinez.

“I learned to be a leader, and I learned to be a resource for people who weren’t as knowledgeable about how certain things work in the publishing process,” Martinez said. “Good leadership is about giving the people you are responsible for the space to cultivate their own skills and their own path forward and to make the experience fun and interesting, even for people who decide it’s not is not for them.”

Martinez hopes to expand the reach of the magazine, which has primarily received more submissions from the undergraduate English department than from any other field.

“There is a lot of untapped potential across the University. Students, faculty, and staff, everyone has their hobbies and interests that might fit with what we do at Conceptions… (I want to) spread the word to STEM people because, even if they don’t pursue can -not having a degree in something relevant to publishing, a lot of them still have interests outside of school, whether it’s art or writing or whatever,” Martinez said.

Martinez also looks forward to encouraging new staff members, welcome from any department, alongside returning staff members on their journey of UNM publications.

“My main goal is to expand the reach of the magazine, not only in terms of contributions, but also people interested in participating as staff members and future editors. It’s a really great opportunity that people just don’t know about,” Martinez said.

Perls, who has known Martinez since kindergarten and worked above her as a writer on both Scribendi and Conceptions, praised her organization, warmth and ability to work with a diverse group of people.

“She has this concern for aesthetics and detail that is very sharp. She has this need to make things look beautiful, both in a harmonious and aesthetic sense, but also in a human sense,” Perls said. “She cares a lot about (editing) and she knows a lot about it…She will bring inclusiveness and warmth to teaching these skills to new staff.”

Outside of Conceptions, Martinez is involved with the Zimmerman Library and the Arita Porcelain Studio. In her little free time, she enjoys spending time with her friends and family, especially her two dogs, Ruby and Blossom, and finding artistic inspiration in her publishing work.

After graduation, Martinez plans to combine her publishing experience with her degree in women’s, gender, and sexuality studies to make the publishing sphere a more equitable space for women and non-political artists. gender-conform. Martinez hopes to showcase their work in her play selection as well as other outside advocacy efforts.

Students interested in getting involved with Conceptions Southwest can stay informed by following them on Instagram @designs_southwest and keep an eye out for information about this year’s first meeting, staff nominations and submission deadline. Copies of last year’s edition can be found in Marron Hall and at UNM Honors College.

Spenser Willden is the culture editor of the Daily Lobo. He can be contacted at culture@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @spenserwillden

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Strict account | Commonwealth Magazine https://nkyzine.com/strict-account-commonwealth-magazine/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 14:03:17 +0000 https://nkyzine.com/strict-account-commonwealth-magazine/ But her parents were determined to make the marriage work, and for thirty-three years they did. The challenges were constant: an old dilapidated house; racist taunts; feed, clothe and educate ten family members on one income. Evaristo’s mother, Ellen, who didn’t return to class until her youngest was in school, was good with money and […]]]>

But her parents were determined to make the marriage work, and for thirty-three years they did. The challenges were constant: an old dilapidated house; racist taunts; feed, clothe and educate ten family members on one income. Evaristo’s mother, Ellen, who didn’t return to class until her youngest was in school, was good with money and with her children: she “had a kind of earthy vibe -mother”, as Evaristo says.

Evaristo’s portrayal of his “militaristic” father – giving long lectures or beating with a spoon and a belt – is more vivid. No longer having the use of two old pianos, he cut them into pieces and burned them in the garden, where he also had his children cut the grass with machetes. Evaristo claims she “didn’t have a proper conversation” with her father as a child and despised him as a teenager. But as she entered adulthood, she began to appreciate the strength and ingenuity that had enabled her to survive in London: he “kept a hammer at the edge of his bed”, defied all insults and, although taciturn at he, and a non-Catholic, was a gregarious member of the local Catholic club. He taught himself plumbing and started his own business; he also became an enthusiastic trade unionist, and eventually an adviser to the Labor Party. Evaristo’s account of learning to love from his father is honest, complicated, and moving without being the least bit sentimental.

Both parents were dedicated to social and racial justice and both were politically active. Unlike his father, Evaristo’s mother, Ellen, was a staunch Catholic. The couple raised their eight children in the Church and negotiated tuition breaks at Catholic schools. Evaristo’s memories of the “theoretically religious” clergy are bitter: she remembers the priests in the confessional “reek of alcohol” and says that they “never reached out to offer interest or assistance to the only black family in their flock. Indeed, what the family believes to be a priest’s first pastoral visit turns out to be a request that the Evaristos sell their house to the parish. A priest, unaware that Ellen is married to a black man, talks about the “darkies”. A “cruel” priest interrupts mass when the large family arrives late. At the age of fifteen, Evaristo left the Church, as his eight siblings and his mother would eventually do.

Yet Evaristo credits his childhood view of Mary with his belief in the “unassailable goodness of women” and the “dramatic and poetic spectacle of church services” for his trajectory as a writer. She doesn’t investigate whether her own quest for racial and gender justice or her seemingly limitless narrative empathy may have been influenced by her early Catholicism — the wounds run too deep. His rejection is total.

This rejection was fueled in part by the Church’s condemnation of its own sexual experimentation. In her twenties, Evaristo lived as a lesbian, until a heartbreaking affair with an older woman led her to rekindle her attraction to men. Although she devotes considerable narrative space to her love life, her tales are not the least bit titillating or superficial: she ties each affair to her growth as an artist and above all to her growing self-confidence. Now long married to a supportive man, she approvingly quotes a friend’s observation that “marriage was freedom.” “I can’t imagine a one-night stand now,” she said, “to expose your naked body to a complete stranger in pursuit of fleeting pleasure?” She still identifies as non-binary and remains intrigued by sexual pleasure as a means of fellowship with other humans. She holds herself to a strict reckoning when remembering her own youthful insensitivity to lovers in need.

Indeed, she keeps her whole life strictly in mind; apart from the memoirs of JM Coetzee, I do not recall another who has been the subject of such scrutiny. While Coetzee is ruthless in her self-judgment, Evaristo is puzzled and as forgiving of herself as she is of others. She began her artistic life as a theater student, in a community theater arts program that would have a huge impact on her role as a black writer determined to mentor and nurture beginning black writers and support those struggling. served by art. In drama school, she was thrilled to finally be in a class with other black women, and with two of the friends she made there, she founded the Theater of Black Women, the first of its kind in England. She was only in her twenties and was already acting, writing plays and administering the company, which meant finding grants and other funding. “Running a black women’s theater company,” she says dryly, “required a certain fieriness and a bloodthirsty spirit.”

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Penn Medicine Radnor connects with nature https://nkyzine.com/penn-medicine-radnor-connects-with-nature/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 06:31:35 +0000 https://nkyzine.com/penn-medicine-radnor-connects-with-nature/ Inspired by environmental stewardship and biophilia, the architecture and landscaping of Penn Radnor Medicine in Radnor, Pennsylvania, embraces nature, physically and philosophically. The shape and facade of the ambulatory care center, designed by Ballinger (Philadelphia), were developed specifically to enhance the patient experience by providing views and bringing daylight into interior spaces. For example, the […]]]>

Inspired by environmental stewardship and biophilia, the architecture and landscaping of Penn Radnor Medicine in Radnor, Pennsylvania, embraces nature, physically and philosophically.

The shape and facade of the ambulatory care center, designed by Ballinger (Philadelphia), were developed specifically to enhance the patient experience by providing views and bringing daylight into interior spaces.

For example, the design team used patient mapping to choreograph views of nature through the facade’s floor-to-ceiling glass walls and windows. Additionally, the building’s two wings, plus an attached 1,000-car garage, form a U-shape around a courtyard.

Public areas of the building, such as waiting areas and suite entrances, face inward toward this space. The circulation corridor around the interior garden promotes the orientation and orientation of patients.

Limited vehicular traffic around the building also allows for a large contiguous area of ​​native habitat on the site.

Jonathan Alderson landscape architects (Wayne, Pennsylvania) incorporated a variety of natural elements into the setting, including a three-acre native prairie, woodland yard, integrated rain gardens, and wet meadows.

Regional plant species were chosen to build habitat, encourage pollination and limit the need for irrigation. The result is a lush landscape that manages 100% of the rainwater on site.

A bird-proof bridge, which features small dots printed on the glass to help birds recognize and avoid the structure, connects the two wings of the building and further improves circulation and wayfinding. The space also serves as a naturally lit lounge for patients and staff with stunning views of nature.

Anne DiNardo is editor-in-chief of healthcare design. She can be contacted at anne.dinardo@emeraldx.com.

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MBS Motorsports ranks in the top ten in Toronto https://nkyzine.com/mbs-motorsports-ranks-in-the-top-ten-in-toronto/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 14:30:34 +0000 https://nkyzine.com/mbs-motorsports-ranks-in-the-top-ten-in-toronto/ TORONTO, ON (July 18, 2022) MBS Motorsports with driver Daniel Bois driving the #31 Chevrolet had another impressive outing in Round 5 of the 2022 NASCAR Pinty’s Series Friday at the Toronto Indy. In only their second series race, Bois raced in the top five in the second race in a row and earned a […]]]>

TORONTO, ON (July 18, 2022) MBS Motorsports with driver Daniel Bois driving the #31 Chevrolet had another impressive outing in Round 5 of the 2022 NASCAR Pinty’s Series Friday at the Toronto Indy.

In only their second series race, Bois raced in the top five in the second race in a row and earned a seventh-place finish.

The MBS team worked meticulously to prepare the #31 for the tough street circuit at Exhibition Place in Toronto. During the combined practice and qualifying session, Bois posted the tenth fastest time and lined up for the 35-lap race outside row five. Several cautionary early periods kept the field tight, and Bois pushed forward.

Racing up to fourth place, he continued to look for opportunities ahead of him. However, the No.31 would feel a bump from behind on more than one occasion. Contact would eventually send him into the tire wall near turn eight. Keeping his wits about him, Bois turned on the tires and fixed the problem.

In the final laps, Bois continued to push the #31 Chevrolet and fought his way to a seventh place finish. The team’s first top 10.

Quotation:
“I’m happy with a seventh place, but at the same time it’s a bit disappointing because we knew the car was even faster.”
“I think my strength during the race was the braking, being able to go deeper into the corners, that was my advantage. Others tried to go as deep into the corners as I did, but it threw their cars off balance. .
“When we got pushed into the tyres, it was a little pat on the back, luckily I was able to get out of it quickly”
“It’s good to have a good result for the whole team, a big thank you to everyone for all the hard work. We can’t wait to have the CTMP back for our next event”.
-Daniel Bois, driver #31 MBS Motorsports Chevrolet

Television and live broadcast
The Toronto Grand Prix will air on TSN and RDS2 on a date to be determined. All races are streamed live on TSN.ca and the TSN app in Canada and FloRacing in the United States.

Racing fans are encouraged to follow the progress of MBS Motorsports Channels during the off-season.

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mbs.motorsports/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mbs.motorsports

About MBS Motorsports
Owned by Don Beatty, Jeff Murphy and Dominic Scrivo, the team will compete in select NASCAR Pinty’s Series events in 2022. Away from the track, Don Beatty operates a successful automotive service business. Jeff Murphy is an executive at Celestica. Dominic Scrivo is the owner of Sierra Excavating Enterprises. #31 Chevrolet driver Daniel Bois is a top driving instructor.

Prepared by Todd Lewis and TL Sports & Entertainment

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Rhyvers Group launches literary magazine Rhyvers Beat https://nkyzine.com/rhyvers-group-launches-literary-magazine-rhyvers-beat/ Sat, 16 Jul 2022 01:42:54 +0000 https://nkyzine.com/rhyvers-group-launches-literary-magazine-rhyvers-beat/ Chandigarh, July 15: The region’s aspiring writers, poets and artists have a new platform to showcase their works. The Rhyvers Media Group today launched its literary magazine Rhyvers Beat at UT Guest House, Chandigarh. Dr. Sumita Misra, IAS, Additional Chief Secretary, Haryana, and President of the Chandigarh Literary Society (CLS) was the chief guest on […]]]>

Chandigarh, July 15: The region’s aspiring writers, poets and artists have a new platform to showcase their works. The Rhyvers Media Group today launched its literary magazine Rhyvers Beat at UT Guest House, Chandigarh.

Dr. Sumita Misra, IAS, Additional Chief Secretary, Haryana, and President of the Chandigarh Literary Society (CLS) was the chief guest on the occasion. Dr. Misra and other distinguished guests launched the print and digital edition of the magazine.

Dr. Misra congratulated the Rhyvers Beat team on their latest adventure. She said authors and creators are always looking for quality platforms to showcase their immense talents. Dr. Misra added that she looked forward to the vibrant participation of creative minds from the region in future editions of Rhyvers Beat.

The magazine was launched in collaboration with the Chandigarh Literary Society. Former IAS officer Vivek Atray graced the occasion as guest of honor.

Mr. Affan Yesvi, Director of Rhyvers Media Group informed that Rhyvers Group is dedicated to publishing high quality literary, academic and creative works. Mr. Yesvi added that Rhyvers Beat will act as a bridge between creative artists and their audiences and readers. He said the glimpse of the extraordinary in the ordinary makes every piece of creative writing, every piece of art, unique.

Mr. Vivek Atray appreciated the efforts of the Rhyvers Group in promoting literature and the creative arts through their various publications and new magazine, Rhyvers Beat and motivated young writers and poets to continue writing and refining their craft .

Dr. Sonika Seth, Editor-in-Chief of Rhyvers Beat, introduced the theme for the inaugural edition. The world is full of negativity and pessimism and in the midst of it all, Rhyvers Beat brings its readers a burst of love and optimism, Sethi said.

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Former Atwater Brewery Owner Launches FÜL Beverage Brand https://nkyzine.com/former-atwater-brewery-owner-launches-ful-beverage-brand/ Thu, 14 Jul 2022 16:23:54 +0000 https://nkyzine.com/former-atwater-brewery-owner-launches-ful-beverage-brand/ FÜL is a new brand of non-alcoholic beers and sports drinks with natural flavors produced locally. // Courtesy of FÜL Detroit veteran brewer Mark Rieth is launching a brand of non-alcoholic beer and sports drinks with natural flavors called FÜL. Pronounced “fuel” and billed as a smart alternative to high-sugar drinks, the drinks are now […]]]>
FÜL is a new brand of non-alcoholic beers and sports drinks with natural flavors produced locally. // Courtesy of FÜL

Detroit veteran brewer Mark Rieth is launching a brand of non-alcoholic beer and sports drinks with natural flavors called FÜL.

Pronounced “fuel” and billed as a smart alternative to high-sugar drinks, the drinks are now hitting the shelves of Michigan retailers.

Rieth says FÜL’s first six products promise a “refreshing” taste that will appeal to anyone seeking “tranquility, harmony, peace, understanding, self-healing, enlightenment and recovery.”

“We recognize that’s a bold promise,” says Rieth, “but we believe we’ve developed bold drinks that are uniquely and cleverly designed for pre-workout social consumption when you just need a little extra energy or after training when you need to recover.

Rieth operated the Atwater Brewery for more than 20 years, growing it from a small batch brewer to one of Michigan’s largest and most successful breweries, before selling the business to Molson Coors in June 2020.

At Atwater, Rieth says he’s committed to restoring Detroit’s legacy as a beer powerhouse. Now, he says he aims to reinvent non-alcoholic beers and sports drinks into healthier, finer and more refreshing beverages.

“Unlike most sports drinks, we only use natural flavors and no preservatives,” he says. “Pre-workout drinks cut out unhealthy sugars and use natural coffee berry caffeine and are lower in calories than their counterparts.

“Post-workout drinks are caffeine-free and contain electrolytes and vitamin B to help your body recover. There’s also a CBD-infused post-workout drink with extra restorative powers. It’s a healthier and more more hydrating to replace lost water in your body.

Pre-workout drinks include Savage Berry, which comes in a 16-ounce can with no preservatives or sugars, and Lit Blood Orange which uses all-natural flavors and natural caffeine to provide an energy boost without added calories or preservatives. .

The post-workout menu includes Recovery Pineapple Coconut, designed to quench thirst, replace electrolytes and serve as vitamin B to help the body recover faster, and Rehab+ Cherry, which includes the best of FÜL’s post-workout ingredients and adds 25mg of CBD. .

Rieth is also launching two non-alcoholic beers, NA IPA and Feel Better Blonde, which have been designed to deliver the full flavor profile of non-alcoholic beer. Beers are healthy, low-calorie alternatives for people who love beer but are on the go.

“Alcohol-free beers have been around for decades, but few brewers treat them with any real respect or pay close attention to flavor,” says Rieth. “FÜL will change that with delicious, hydrating beers for active people who love the taste, but are on the go or need to drive home.”

Each of FÜL’s cans is designed for a specific flavor and each bears the motto Fuel Your Quest for Alchemy.

“We think alchemy is a great cultural statement because our products are designed to change you for the better,” says Rieth. “Each drink is deliberately balanced to give you – and your body – exactly what it needs, starting with great taste and hydration without the unnecessary additives and calories. And we believe that once people will have tried them, they will be addicted and will want more.

Rieth has plans for additional products and ingredients and is developing new retail concepts.

“We’re just getting started,” he says. “We have many more innovative products and ideas to come. We see FÜL as the start of a cultural statement, where company and customer come together in a quest to find zen in life. I am thrilled to begin this new journey, with my continued commitment to quality and absolute dedication to Detroit and Michigan.

FÜL Beverage NA beers will be available in six packs of 12-ounce cans. FÜL Alternative Energy Drinks are available in individual 16-ounce cans and 12-packs.

More information and direct website sales are also available at FULbeverage.com.

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